Fenugreek and Thyroid: Be Wary Of What You Take!

I’m sure many mothers know about how fenugreek helps in increasing one’s breastmilk supply. This herb is multitasking and comes with a host of excellent benefits, used as a spice and to treat digestion and sores. However, you may have also heard about the connection between Fenugreek and thyroid issues. 

While Fenugreek comes with a host of advantages based on studies, you need to be wary, as it still has some side effects. This is especially if you have thyroid disease and take medications for it. 

With that said, what is Fenugreek and Thyroid Disease and how does the herb affect it? Read on as I show you all about Fenugreek, thyroid, and if you need to throw away all your herbs or not!

What Is Fenugreek? How Does It Help In Breastfeeding?

fenugreek and thyroid
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Fenugreek is an extremely popular supplement many take for its promising results. 

Besides this, this herb is usually found in Chinese and Indian cooking for its intense flavors.

You can have it as tea, in capsule form, or powdered form, known to promote wellness and a mother’s milk production. It’s also used to lessen inflammation, so the sores and wounds, as well as aid in digestion and perform as an appetite stimulant for weight loss! 

Besides this, this herb is usually found in Chinese and Indian cooking for its intense flavors. Some companies also use it for artificial maple syrup. 

Other people suggest that the herb increases hormones to stimulate breastmilk production.

But I want to focus more on how this herb helps with breastfeeding mothers. How exactly does it work in promoting better milk production and quality?

There isn’t a clear answer as to how the herb works, but some propose that Fenugreek increases sweating. Since breasts are a large sweat gland, it can improve the milk production within. Other people suggest that the herb increases hormones to stimulate breastmilk production. 

Many mothers have sworn on the herb and lactation consultants have recommended it most.

This is thanks to the galactagogue, a component in Fenugreek which is known to increase milk supply. Many mothers have sworn on the herb and lactation consultants have recommended it most. 

Fenugreek and Thyroid: What’s the Connection?

fenugreek thyroid
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You know the connection of the herb and milk production, but what about Fenugreek and thyroid disease?

Another study shows that the herb has shown changes in other glucose levels and G-6-phosphatase levels.

The reason why women take thyroid medication is due to hypothyroidism (underachieve thyroid glands), which can cause issues in conception. Some pregnant women may also have to take it because of thyroid abnormalities that may arise during the period. 

And besides the different Fenugreek side effects (which I’ll explain in the next section), women taking thyroid medication may experience different effects. 

There aren’t a lot of published studies based on the safety of taking Fenugreek for women who have thyroid conditions. 

While considered safe, it’s still best to consult with your doctor before taking any supplement.

However, there are animal studies conducted which show that the herb decreases blood T3 levels. This causes hypoglycaemic effects or low blood sugar. Another study shows that the herb has shown changes in other glucose levels and G-6-phosphatase levels. 

This can affect your thyroid’s performance, which is why it’s highly recommended to avoid Fenugreek or take it with caution. While considered safe, it’s still best to consult with your doctor before taking any supplement.

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Other Side Effects Fenugreek May Have 

But again, whether you have thyroid problems or any other conditions that affect your milk supply, it’s best to consult with your doctor and a lactation consultant first.

Besides the studies I mentioned above, there are other side effects you need to be wary of when taking Fenugreek. Not only do these side effects affect women with thyroid problems, but in other people, too! Here are the possible side effects to watch out for:

•When taken in huge amounts (some women think that a lot of Fenugreek to the point they smell like maple syrup can increase milk production), this increases the intensity of the side effects.

 • The herb can cause diarrhea or upset intestines in a few people, though this only happens when taking huge amounts of it. It may cause upset stomachs because of the amount of fiber it has, especially if you take other supplements that include it.

 • Fenugreek is a legume, standing beside peas, peanuts, soy, and beans. If you’re allergic to any of these, then it’s best to avoid the herb to prevent allergic reactions.

 • As mentioned, clinical trials show how the herb can lower blood sugar, used for diabetics. It may show different and adverse side effects if you suffer from hypoglycemia or have diabetes. 

Fortunately, this herb is still considered safe and used worldwide, without any reported deaths. But again, whether you have thyroid problems or any other conditions that affect your milk supply, it’s best to consult with your doctor and a lactation consultant first. 

They can determine why you have poor milk supply and recommend helpful herbs and supplements other than Fenugreek, which may be safer depending on your circumstances. 

How to Use Fenugreek Safely 

fenugreek and thyroid disease
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I recommend that you take it with other herbs to help lessen the symptoms.

So, how much Fenugreek do you need and how can you take it safely?

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If you still plan on taking Fenugreek, then I recommend that you take only less than 2,500mg a day. For women who take it for milk production, discontinue taking it when your milk supply has already increased well. I recommend that you take it with other herbs to help lessen the symptoms.

Wrapping It Up

When it comes to breastfeeding and milk production, you need to make sure that you know what you’re taking! While herbs and supplements help with you and your baby’s health, be wary with Fenugreek and thyroid, which can be detrimental to your milk. That’s why you need to be sure you learn more about the different supplements you’re taking to stay in good health for you and your little one.

Hopefully, this article on Fenugreek and side effects on thyroid informed you on what you should take and how much. So if you’re worried about your hypothyroidism and milk supply, I suggest you look for alternative herbs and supplements other than Fenugreek today.

If you have more questions or want to share what you know about hypothyroidism and Fenugreek, then comment below. Your thoughts are much appreciated!