Protein For Breastfeeding: The Benefits to Know!

If there’s one thing I love, it’s protein, which holds a ton of health benefits everyone needs. And if you’re asking if protein for breastfeeding moms is important, YES, it is. However, you have to know how much protein you need and the type you consume for better health and milk production.

With that said, I’m sure you’re wondering, “How much protein do I need while breastfeeding?” Not only that, but moms also want to know about how much protein in breast milk to know if they’re giving their little ones the right amount!

I researched to show you all about protein for breastfeeding moms, so read on!

What Is Protein? 

protein for breastfeeding
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It also creates hormones, enzymes, and various body chemicals, known as the building block of your cartilage, blood, and skin, besides your bones and muscles.

Before we get into the necessary amount of protein for breastfeeding moms, let’s first get into what protein is. 

Protein is crucial for both immune and neurological function, known as building blocks for your muscle, tissues, and bones. Your hair and nails are mostly made out of protein, while this nutrient helps repair and build tissue. It also creates hormones, enzymes, and various body chemicals, known as the building block of your cartilage, blood, and skin, besides your bones and muscles.

The Importance of Protein For Breastfeeding Moms 

protein and breastfeeding
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Because of how important protein is, all people, especially those of childbearing age, need a healthy amount of protein.

Protein also offers you enough energy and strength to keep you awake and have you focus on tasks at hand.

When talking about the recommended protein intake for mothers, you have to take into account that you need protein to recover from any strains from pregnancy and childbirth. 

Besides this, protein offers a host of benefits that make it essential for a mother (and child’s) diet, such as:

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•It offers the optimal nutrition to maintain our lean tissue, also ensuring your milk supply has enough protein your baby needs

•If you have the extra baby weight from giving birth, then a protein-rich diet can help you shed the pounds. Not to worry though, as having extra protein still maintains your nutrition. Just decrease your fat and increase your protein intake, which curbs the appetite to lose weight.

•Protein also offers you enough energy and strength to keep you awake and have you focus on tasks at hand. You’ll have enough power to care for your new baby and take care of other household chores.

It isn’t just important for the mother, but it’s also crucial for infants, especially premature ones. Premature infants need a diet very high in protein, and that protein amount form breastmilk would decline as your children grow.

 It also helps them grow new cells in his brain, muscles, and organs.  

For instance, mothers nursing a 7-month old premature infant may have as much as four times more protein compared to mothers nursing toddlers.

With proper protein consumption from your breastmilk, your baby will grow healthily, with better bones and tissue. It also helps them grow new cells in his brain, muscles, and organs. 

How Much Protein Do Moms Need? 

how much protein while breastfeeding
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You need to have a balance of it as well and to avoid eating too much or little of protein for optimal nutrition balance.

Now that you know why protein is important, how much of it should you have as a breastfeeding mom? A lot of people have misconceptions on how much protein for breastfeeding moms need, with some overloading too much! 

You need to have a balance of it as well and to avoid eating too much or little of protein for optimal nutrition balance. While there aren’t any negative side effects to extra protein (and can even benefit in milk quality and volume), it’s best to keep it balanced for your little one.

Take 17 grams or more protein daily during the first six to eight months of breastfeeding.

With that said, a breastfeeding mom may need more protein compared to the average woman.

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For example, if you’re an active 30-year old woman who’s 5’4 and weighs 120 pounds, then you need at LEAST 71 grams of protein daily. For an average woman who isn’t breastfeeding, they only need up to 44-50 grams. 

If you are breastfeeding, then experts recommend that you take 17 grams or more protein daily during the first six to eight months of breastfeeding.

To help get a more accurate number, you can refer to online calculators or talk with your doctor.

The exact amount of protein you need as a breastfeeding mom and average woman depends on different factors, such as your age, height, weight, and activity levels. To help get a more accurate number, you can refer to online calculators or talk with your doctor. 

They can recommend adequate intake of macronutrients to help get you started. That way, you’ll know how much carbs, fat, and protein you need for high-quality breastmilk and to maintain your best health. 

 

What Kind of Protein Should You Take?

Just because you know how much protein you take doesn’t mean you can eat or drink ANYTHING with protein. You also have to focus on high-quality and healthier protein choices.

Don’t just concentrate on getting your protein from one meal!

Most adults, including breastfeeding mothers, should have a protein-rich diet that consists of the following sources:

•Lean meat

•Eggs

•Yogurt

•Tofu

•Nuts

•Beans

•Quinoa

Avoid consuming fish like mackerel and tuna, as this contains mercury and various toxins that may be detrimental for you and your baby’s health.

Besides this, make sure that you space out your protein intake throughout the day. Don’t just concentrate on getting your protein from one meal!

They also may contain high amounts of heavy metals which affect your baby’s health!

Furthermore, avoid taking protein supplements or taking protein shakes. While convenient and packed with protein, they also contain a lot of sugar and additives, not enough nutrients required for you and your breastmilk. They also may contain high amounts of heavy metals which affect your baby’s health!

Wrapping It Up

As a new mom, it isn’t just your little one’s diet that’s important, it’s yours, too! Without the proper diet, you won’t be able to have the energy to care for your baby, or even have enough nutrients from your breastmilk. With a good protein intake for breastfeeding moms, you won’t have that problem anymore.

I hope this article on protein for breastfeeding fave you an idea on what else you should add to your diet. So start eating right and create an efficient diet plan for you and your little one’s benefit now.

If you have any questions or want to share your knowledge on protein and breastfeeding, then comment below. Your thoughts are much appreciated!